Cicero Yearly Archives

Metropolitan Police

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London Gay Pride : “Will You Marry Me?”


Record number of people attended todays London Gay Pride and it is was estimated it would attract over a million people attending especially following the tragic mass shooting that left 49 people dead and 53 people severely injured in PULSE the gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida.

The march also has also allowed both Gay and straight Muslims a chance to march and show their solidarity following the shooting by an Omar Mir Seddique Mateen.

Obviously there was heightened security on all marched across the world where Pride is being held this year and  dozens of cities are donning the colours of the rainbow this weekend. Today’s marches and celebrations were in  London;  and New York and Chicago. But they will be being held in world wide over the 2016 summertime.

A number of photos have hit social media including heart-warming  photographs showing the moment a couple of police officers became engaged at London Pride and posted by the Metropolitan Police LGBT network.  In both photographs both proposals were accepted.

One of the pictures tweeted by the Met’s LGBT network, shows a photo of a uniformed officer proposing to his boyfriend in the audience. The total number of Met Officers who took part in todays London Pride and joining the march was around 80, and the march also included other UK Police forces, the London Ambulance Service and London Fire Brigade in the carnival procession.

The LGBT Metropolitan Police Network aims to create a more knowledgeable workforce that can respond to crimes and issues affecting the LGBT community sensitively and began through a conversation over coffee in Berlin at the European Gay Police Association conference in 2014.

The following was tweeted on their Twitter page.

ICYMI: Amazing to see all the love for the newly engaged couple flooding our notifications!https://t.co/IUSjjIzGJo

                               — Pride in London (@LondonLGBTPride) June 25, 2016

He said yes too @LondonLGBTPride @MetLGBTNetwork @LGBTpoliceuk#ByYouSide #OrlandoShooting

— MET LGBT Network (@MetLGBTNetwork) June 25, 2016

Also attending the Pride Carnival March and Rally in London were over 300 charities, businesses and organisations who marched through the West End. The whole of the area has been transformed into a sea of bright colours in honour of the LGBT community and London Mayor Mayor Sadiq Khan recently stressed it was ‘more important than ever’  to support the LGBT community in the festival following the Orlando mass shooting.

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                   (Picture Sources: London Evening Standard & Met LGBT Network )

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75 years of the 999 Emergency Number


75 years of the 999 Emergency ServiceSeventy five years ago this weekend the first ever emergency number system anywhere in the world came into being in London with the introduction of the 999 call – marking a sea-change in the way the public communicated with the Metropolitan Police.

The MPS will be marking the anniversary by launching its first ever live twitter feed from one of its three central communications complexes (CCC) where ‘first contact’ operators answer tens of thousands of emergency calls every week.

For twelve hours on Friday 29 June, the public will be able to get an understanding into the huge variety of calls operators deal with on a daily basis – and gain insight into the pressures faced by staff as they have to make minute by minute decisions in the most difficult of circumstances.

In other events to mark the anniversary, a special commemorative section has been set up on the Met’s Facebook page featuring video interviews with 999 operators, a wide range of photos, illustrations and facts and figures relating to the history of the service.

The site and a special new display of historical artefacts dating back to 1829, documents and photos relating to emergency communication chart the significant developments in the service between 1937, when a handful of officers used counters on large table maps to denote police cars and messages were transmitted by morse code, and the present day’s sophisticated high-tech command centres.

Metcall, Metropolitan Police, London, England

Metcall, Metropolitan Police, London, England (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In the early days of the 1930s just 24 staff in the old Victoria Embankment headquarters of Scotland Yard dealt with a couple of hundred calls a day. Contrast this with 2012, when we have three centralised communications complexes (CCC) in Bow, Hendon and Lambeth, employing over 2,000 workers dealing with an average of 14,000 calls a day.

The system has been upgraded and redesigned numerous times over the past seven decades, leading to the sophisticated multi-screen automated service in use today that prioritises 999 and non-emergency 101 calls using interactive satellite mapping as well as access to translators in 170 languages and special text phone numbers for the deaf.

Source: Metropolitan Police and the Met’s Facebook Page.

The Liver Run


Cromwell Hospital

This  enthralling piece of footage is the second part of the crucial delivery of a donor liver by the Metropolitan Police.

The liver was collected from Stanstead Airport by the Essex police on its first part of its journey – however the Metropolitan police had the unenviable task of navigating into London to the Cromwell Hospital

The journey begins from Junction 7 by two Metropolitan police Rover SD1 3500s. The two cars(one a back-up) speed Southbound into London. At times their speeds peak at  120 Mph .

The journey  was made in 30 mins with just 5 minutes to spare and described as one of the finest examples of police driving under pressure ever captured on video.

Around 50 police officers were used to help transport the liver. These were mainly posted in advance to road junctions to stop the traffic as the liver run approached.

When driving through The City area of London, two motorbikes from the City of London police helped escort the Metropolitan police cars.

Riot Uniform Hindered says PC


A police officer on duty during riots in Manchester and Salford on Tuesday has said outdated heavy protective gear made it “difficult” to make arrests.

Insp Bob Cantrell, of Greater Manchester Police, said that when faced with violent youths wearing trainers, it was “very difficult to catch them”.

His comments came after criticisms that police had not done enough.

Speaking about future police cuts, he said he hoped the government would be “there for us”.

Source:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-144911

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